We 'Ced Youth Media
Merced's youth voice


 
 

Identity

Becoming a Womyn: My Experience at Sisterhood Rising

Posted July 19, 2016 by We'Ced

At camp, I wasn’t just given a definition of “woman” to absorb. I learned that being a “womyn” (as opposed to a wo-MAN) is about how I define myself, not how society defines me. Being a womyn is about taking charge of your own life.

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Family

Dear Mom, I Need You

Posted June 30, 2016 by We'Ced

I believe no child should grow up feeling unwanted, unsupported,or rejected by a parent. I do not want any person to go through what I have endured in my lifetime. I’ve known my entire life that I am different, and I’ve accepted it, but knowing my mom does not has really hurt me.

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Identity

What It’s Like to Grow Up Queer and Purepecha

Posted June 29, 2016 by We'Ced

The Purepecha are an indigenous group from the Mexican state of Michoacan. Ardent Roman Catholics, they are known for their artwork, including ceramics and woodwork. There are about 2000 Purepecha living in the Coachella Valley, mostly in Duros and Chicanitas, two trailer camps on the Torres Martinez reservation. Many work in the surrounding fields and speak little to no Spanish or English.

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Food

The Central Valley Is a Tough Place for Vegetarians

Posted April 27, 2016 by We'Ced

Meat is part of our local culture; it’s a part of everyday life. Some of my friends and lots of other people around here have grown up raising animals for meat. So learning how to express my thoughts on vegetarianism to friends while still respecting the way they grew up is challenging for me. I often draw on my own personal experience.

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Family

DACA Gives Korean Immigrant a ‘Shot in the Arm’

Posted March 1, 2016 by We'Ced

Cheong had graduated at the top of his class in Baltimore, but here in the Bay Area, college after college turned down his application for in-state tuition. He finally enrolled in De Anza Community College in Cupertino, working part-time as a cashier in local restaurants to help with tuition. The college fees, he said, were not exactly affordable, but they were “manageable.” His father’s salary as a pastor at a small South Bay Korean church, and his mother’s job as an announcer at a Korean radio station barely covered his tuition.

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